Tuesday, 8 August 2017

Sash Window Surprise and Mystery

Yesterday I started to tackle the complete renovation of the last large 2 over 2 sash window
in the house - this one is in the hall (photo right), and there are still two small sashes in the bathroom to be done but they are one over one, so they hardly count. (NB The front door is at right angles to the window, behind the wall to the right.)

Now, the weather this August has not been too good, and this week is no exception. Having identified this as the last two week period this year when the job could be done, I started yesterday but didn't get very far in that weather. In fact it was pretty depressing as, having been pretty successful in removing the old glass on the four similar windows which I have renovated in the last two years, yesterday I broke three panes on only the one sash. Now, since the window is 2 over 2, by definition one sash has only two panes - I broke both those and, in seeing if a spare piece of glass from a previous window would fit, I broke that too! However, today was better. I got both wavy panes out of the top sash unbroken, and also stripped both sashes to bare wood, including getting all the putty out.

The surprise was the discovery that the top sash has never been a moving window. It has no pulleys and weights, nor even an attachment point for any cords.

The mystery is that although it was quite difficult to get the top sash out, this was entirely due to the fact that it
had been generously painted in on several occasions - there was no other visible attachment holding it in place. No screws, no nails, no wedge, nothing. How did they do that?

Left is a picture showing the pulley for the lower sash and an unpainted piece of wood with no hole where it should be for the pulley for the upper sash!

Fortunately, when trying to free the upper sash with a Stanley knife, I was well aware that there might be no cords holding it, so I did the job very carefully. I was most relieved when I had it in my hands complete and undamaged, and even more pleased when I had both panes out safely an hour later.


Edit following completion of the task: Mystery solved! The top sash was originally held up by a pair of very fine nails - basically long panel pins - which were nailed upwards at an angle of 45 degrees at the bottom of each vertical part of the sash frame. These of course were ferrous and so had rusted away a long time ago; it took me a long while before I found the traces of the tiny rusty holes as I knew they had to be there somewhere!

I am very pleased to have had the whole window repainted, reassembled and working on the eighth day of this project; it took about 30 manhours and looks pretty good. I didn't bother to even take any photos of the stages as it was just the same as the earlier ones, apart from the fixed window. Now all I have left are two small one over one sashes which form the bathroom window - that's a project for next year.

Friday, 19 May 2017

Plan for the Year

It might seem a bit late to be making a plan for the year in mid-May, but nearly everything I need to do is either outside or requires me to make frequent trips outside, and so the weather has been beating me. Right now I am feeling defeated as the forecast was for some cloud, clearing to the east, followed by scattered cloud with possibility of rain; we have actually had overcast cloud with drizzle for the entire day, punctuated by two half hour fool's breaks (you know, when you think you can do something and start, only for the rain to start again).

Anyway, there are jobs to be done and the first is to make a list:

a. Sash windows - two large ones are left to be refurbished, and there is a smaller pair in the bathroom. Hopefully I will get at least the two large ones done this year - one is in the kitchen and the other is in the hall (but there is also some remedial work to do on one of last year's where some putty has slipped).

b. Plastering - I need to do the inset bit at the top of the hall window which is hanging, albeit still complete, plus the three inset bits around the main bedroom window. These bits were all not done in 2010/11 as they looked OK then, but they are showing signs of wear around the edges!

c. Garden walls - I have been doing some repairs to two of the garden walls, and this could continue for ages as they are in pretty poor condition. In many cases I have to remove several stones and carefully remortar them (with NHL3.5) so that they are set solid before I do the next bit above. There is also the front (side) garden wall which I found last year was bowing horribly towards my neighbour's garden - and it is about 10' high, so that's quite a worry. However, that rebuild won't happen this year...

d. The back garden needs lots of tidying where the residue of 2011's work is still apparent, and there's still some ground elder to dig up carefully.

e. Redecoration - I think that 'Er Indoors wants some redecoration in at least one of the back bedrooms and, possibly, the lounge.

I have done some things this year - the wardrobe in a back bedroom was completed back in February, which has allowed a rearrangement of the stuff in our main wardrobe. As another consequence, we have been able to dispose of some items of furniture.

I have also been helping my next elder brother and both my sisters to tidy our parents' house. Mum died in 2015 and Dad is now in a carehome with vascular dementia; at 95, clearly he will not be going home again. I think the house will need to be sold by early next year to pay for the carehome which is really quite expensive. As part of clearing that house in London I have occasionally brought things back home for disposal or sale - such items always take priority over mere house jobs and selling things on eBay is actually quite time-consuming, I think.

The major change this year is that my other half has retired from full-time work. This has been quite an adjustment for both of us, as I had been so used to her disappearing early in the day and arriving back much later in time for an evening meal (made by me); this routine allowed me to work out the day for myself as I wanted, but suddenly there is someone else wanting to use the car, or the bathroom, or whatever room I wanted to work in etc. You get the picture!

I've been retired for nearly seven years now, and haven't really stopped until the last year or so - at last, this is what retirement is really like?

Sunday, 22 January 2017

A Rare Excursion into Politics



I don’t often comment publicly on politics, and have avoided doing so on Brexit. However, I feel the need to commit a few views on Donald Trump to print at this time, as a sort of prediction – just in case it all comes true, I can say “I said so in Jan 2017!”

Now that he is in post, people have to accept that situation. It is not clear how things will turn out – the only predictable thing about DT is his unpredictability! How many of his pre-election promises will he enact, and how many will he forget? Does he even know that himself? He is pretty clever but seems to revel in doing things that no politician would normally contemplate – either he is VERY clever or real stupid. For instance, why pick a fight with his own intelligence services? Does he really trust Putin?

No matter how these things pan out, I am sure that many politicians in the US will already be thinking “how do we ensure that he does not get re-elected?” Now, I have no clear idea about how the American election system works in this sort of case but I guess that normally the sitting first-term president is a shoe-in as the candidate for his party in the next election; presumably there is a party convention at which he is adopted as the candidate, long before the other side hold their primary elections. I guess this would therefore be in just under three years time, say in autumn (sorry, “fall”) of 2019.

That timescale gives him a fair time in which to either change his spots and become more political like a normal president (no chance!) or else to do his own thing and see where it gets him (far more likely). In this latter case, he seems to think that he controls both houses of Congress; if I was a US senator, I would be quite happy to support my president when he says what he wants, just for a while, but eventually I am sure he will expect continued unquestioning support for several measures which even some Republicans will find a bit beyond the pale. After two or three goes of this, I am sure that any initial support, from the Republicans who just wanted a president from their side again, will just disappear. The Republican majority in the Senate is 52 vs 48, so it only needs three to get fed up with DT and they no longer have a majority.  In the House of Representatives, the Republicans hold 241 of the 435 seats and so would have to have 24 members defect to lose a vote (or, in each case, more if they just abstain).

Hence the question becomes – when will that happen? When will the Republican majorities in either house just no longer be able to stomach DT? I reckon that many of these congressmen will see their careers lasting longer than just 2024, and so will want to see the back of him in 2020.

Following that, how long before the party at large decides that they don’t want him for another four years? The way he is going already, he can only lose support within his party and within the country, yet he would need all the same support to be re-elected. It baffles me how intelligent people can believe all that he told them and vote for him (just like it baffles me that lots of ordinary people believed Boris and Co about Brexit – how can you expect to leave a club and then negotiate a trade deal which will be as good if not better than the one you currently have?). I am sure that most will realise that they have been conned, especially in relation to employment, not to mention the cost of all the things he promised.

So, I predict that DT will get ditched by his party at some time in the next three years, and they will search for new candidates with a set of primaries; DT will want to stand as one of those and, if he can’t, then he will stand for re-election as an independent. We just have to live with him and his unpredictability for the next four years - what damage will he do in that time? Will we still be here?

Friday, 13 January 2017

More New Year Resolutions

I have found making resolutions beneficial in the last few years - at least by writing my intentions at the start of the year, I then cannot deny what I wrote! Also, it helps my failing memory about what I intended to do, and then what I actually achieved (and when).

The most momentous event of the year was that t'other half finally retired and so no longer travels to London each weekday; we are still trying to work out how to exist together for seven days per week, when for the last six years I have been accustomed to being on my own (and doing the shopping and cooking) for five of those days. We have already learned the benefits of not waking at 6.15am, and are still catching up on years of lost sleep!

Last year I did achieve most of my intentions:

a. The hall landing and stairs were painted in the Earthborn claypaint
b. I stripped, repaired and repainted one half of the back gates
c. I managed to renovate two more sash windows (the back bedrooms)
d. I installed a wardrobe in the second bedroom, using the doors and frame given to me by the neighbour who was throwing them out  - I'm very pleased with the result
e. I built a second wood-store and also did a couple of similar jobs in the church

However, I still have the following to do this year:

1.There is still some plastering to do: the window recess in the front bedroom is some of the last original plaster left, and it doesn't sound good. 

2. In painting the hall I found that the plaster in the top of the hall window recess was dropping down and so needs to be re-done as well, with lime plaster.  It would make sense to do both 1 and 2 at the same time but that will make a mess in two places at the same time, and the job will want three or four coats with drying time between.

3. The wardobe in the front bedroom needs plastering (modern stuff - it's panelled with plasterboard).

4. I still want to put fire black on some fireplaces - I've never done that before and feel that it could be messy!

5. There are still two more of the same size sash windows (hall and kitchen) to do, plus the pair of small ones in the bathroom.

6. One very new job is that the high stone wall (between our neighbour's back garden and our front) needs to be rebuilt - it is about 8 feet high on my side, and about 10 feet on my neighbour's, due to the difference in ground levels. It has a lot of ivy damage and also leans alarmingly. I think I will get it done by a professional...

We have our daughter's wedding to look forward to in August, and have also booked a cruise from Aqaba to Spain just before Easter. Somehow I don't think the year is going to hang around!


Wednesday, 26 October 2016

Repairs to Large Stone Wall

I have a new neighbour - not the other half of my semi-detached house but the other side.  Their house has a door onto the pavement, whereas my house is set back 15 metres, with the result that there is a wall  between my front garden and their back garden. They have done a phenomenal amount of work on their place in a very short space of time (mostly based on the right principles). One of the things they have done was to remove the huge amount of ivy on this 16" thick limestone wall which, sadly, has revealed that the wall is not in as good a condition as I thought.

The wall is of a mixed construction being partly coursed random rubble and partly roughly
squared - see photo (the bin is just there to give an idea of scale). Where it was clear of ivy (left of picture) there are mostly blocks with good pointing, which is why I thought the whole thing was in good condition; however, much of the rest is coursed random rubble. The whole is capped by 3" limestone slabs, 16" wide and about 30" long; these seem to have been set with a small slope for drainage. Now that the ivy is largely cleared (the darker area where the ladder is), it is apparent that the coursed random rubble is in pretty poor condition with loose or missing mortar, ivy penetrating the wall and loose stones in the first couple of feet down from the top.

The wall starts off pretty vertical (where it leaves the neighbours' house, out of the left side of the above picture) but moving away from the house it has a bow which means that the natural taper has become vertical on their side and a quite marked slope on mine. The top looks awful (left photo) but it's not possible to say what the original slope of the coping was; it has certainly increased a lot in places, but I don't have an clinometer so I can't measure it.
The trouble is that the wall is pretty big. My side is about 8 ft high, and their garden is probably about 3 ft lower than mine (as my garden slopes up and theirs is level throughout), so they have an 11ft wall towering over their patio. A major rebuild is definitely needed; legally I think it's their wall, but it's my ivy. Both houses are listed and in a conservation area. A like-for-like repair does not need LBC but, as it's so high, I'll find someone more experienced to do it for me, rather than do it myself as next year's project. I wouldn't want the responsibility if it fell over later.

I've had a builder look at it and his view is that the bow means that the top has moved over a foot out of true, which is a lot, and so it looks as though the neighbours and I will have a discussion about this with a view to rebuilding the top few feet sometime next spring!

Friday, 22 July 2016

The Year is half over

It seems hardly possible that we are now in the second half of the year. How time flies! How the world has changed so much in a short time! How much have I done to the house? What more will I achieve in the remainder of the year?

We've now been here for five years, and that hardly seems credible either. I first saw this house at the start of August 2010, and it immediately spoke to me. Moreover, I knew that it would speak to my other half as well - she has the vision (so often lacking in those TV property programmes!) to look past the defects and the undergrowth, and to see what a place could be. We never had any real doubt that this was the place for us, and I can still recall the evening of the day we moved in - we shared a wonderful sense of peace and satisfaction that this was OUR HOME, in every sense of the phrase (despite the boxes, mess and work still outstanding).

Back to my questions above. Firstly, I have been mentioning about the internal doors since 2012 (when I did the door from the kitchen to the new extension); in 2013 I started on the three doors in the hall (filter on "decorating" or "doors" to find these posts) These are the original doors with four recessed rectangles, the upper pair being slightly larger; the doors were covered with some revolting brown stuff which gummed up sandpaper in two strokes and was eventually removed with a three handed operation involving a hot air gun, a scraper and a Stanley knife; the knife had to be used after every stroke to remove the molten globule from the scraper, otherwise the next stroke would leave as much as it removed. I managed this by holding both the heat gun and the Stanley knife in my left hand, at the expense of a slight strain to the thumb!

Compounding the difficulty of the brown gunk, both sides of the lounge door and one side of the kitchen door have a moulding around each of the four rectangles, which made removal of the gunk even more onerous. There was also the architrave around both sides of the kitchen door - I confess that in 2015 I gave in and replaced the architrave around the lounge door (which had been split on one side in earlier works although I forget exactly how).

Anyway, I stuck at the removal task and had done the two main doors by last autumn. Remaining was the door to the cupboard under the stairs, which I did in February this year. The nice touch on this one was to add a bit of architrave above it, which has improved the look considerably. They are finished in eggshell eau-de-nil which looks really good with the gentle yellow of the claypaint walls.

Secondly, I determined that there were some jobs for which I just had to bite the bullet, namely the sash windows. I did one (the largest and most complicated!) last year, and soon I'll post a detailed report on the ones I have done this year. Once again, my choice of window was thwarted - t'other half wanted me to start with the other bedrooms, and I wanted to do the bathroom small pair at the front. Anyway, the pretty large sash in both bedrooms is now complete and they really do look better. I estimated last year that the first one took me 60 hours; both these are not quite as large and have one glazing bar less, and took me about 40 hours each.

I have also built a second wood store outside, and have tackled a few of those little jobs that one puts off, like the bit of stone on the front corner which was missing (as someone had indented a bit of wood from the gate frame into the wall! WHY?). There remains for this year the two small sash windows in the bathroom, some lime plastering around two recessed windows and a new wardrobe in the second bedroom; that will leave just two sashes for next year. Perhaps then I will have to find new ways of enjoying my retirement!

Monday, 4 January 2016

Another Year

Another year starts and so it's time to review what I've done on the house and what I intend to do this year!

I did do a couple of things not listed in the last progress update last June or the end of year update immediately below this entry:

a. The hall landing and stairs were painted in the Earthborn claypaint and look lovely - I do recommend this stuff, but to get the best result you need to roll it rather than brush it.
b. I stripped, repaired and repainted one half of the back gates - as they are from different sources they wear differently, and the one half that I had renovated in 2011 was looking quite poorly.  I think this was because it wasn't actually as dry as I thought then.

Now, in the coming year, there are a few big-ish jobs left:

1.  The big question is how many sash windows I will renovate.  My plan is to do at least the narrow pair in the bathroom, followed by the one in the hall.  That will leave one in the kitchen and two in the back bedrooms.

2. There is also some plastering to do: the window recess in the front bedroom is some of the last original plaster left, and it doesn't sound good.  Having done the window last year, it makes sense to tackle this tricky bit of work.

3.  In painting the hall I found that the plaster in the top of the hall window recess was dropping down and so needs to be re-done as well, with lime plaster.  It would make sense to do both 2 and 3 at the same time but that will make a mess in two places at the same time, and the job will want three or four coats with drying time between.

4.  The wardobe in the front bedroom needs plastering (modern stuff - it's panelled with plasterboard).

5.  I want to install a wardrobe in the second bedroom, but that means that I have to sort out a full four drawer filing cabinet and other stuff...

6.  I'd like to put fire black on some fireplaces - I've never done that before and feel that it could be messy!

7.  Then there's more decorating and other internal jobs, plus more tidying in the garden - but these all count as maintenance.

Other than those, we have a cruise holiday booked in March and we're going to a square dance convention for three days in July.  Moreover the church is not doing any major work this year as our current grant application is for 2017, so it might be a more relaxed year!

http://www.heyfordhoofers.org.uk/ 



Sunday, 4 October 2015

Finishing the Summer's Work


Firstly, here's a picture of the finished sash window (upper left window in the picture right). It was a lot of work - probably more than 60 man-hours - but it was worth it simply for the satisfaction of a job well done, plus the appreciation of t'other half!

As I said in August, I'd like to think that the finish on my window is better than the (not so long ago professionally refurbished) window of my neighbour (upper right).  Certainly mine was cheaper and still has the glass that it had when I bought it (although two large panes are not original wavy glass).

Apart from the sash window, I have also done the garden (right) along the side of the house.  This is the bit seen from the kitchen window, so it was really good to get it done before winter.

Having moved half a ton of earth from front to back, the side garden was ready for some turf which I acquired from a well known home store.  The bit recently done is in front of the shed up to the brick wall.  The turf didn't cost the full price as it was quite yellow but, having been down for ten days, it is now indistinguishable in colour from the stuff laid earlier (in three separate phases!) which stretches to the back wall in the distance.  NB The grass ramp is to allow me to push the mower up (as the same mower has to do this raised lawn and the front lawn) - I could lift it up now but know that one day soon it will become impossible for me!

I needed a small amount of top soil to sort out the levels of the last turf beside the shed; this was planned to come from laying a bit more driveway in front but this job just didn't get done for ages until happily it all happened suddenly a few weeks ago.  The new space (left) is only a small addition but I didn't want to loose too much of the lawn out front.  It allows much easier turning of cars in front, as well as a bit more parking when the family visit.

On the left is the view from the back of the garden looking along the side of the house. The back gates still need some work but otherwise now everything is just gardening rather than earth-moving, brickwork or stone work.  As my wife said, "you did all of that yourself!"

Compare this view with the next picture below, which was taken from pretty well the very same spot.
 
Here's a couple of reminders of what it looked like just before we bought it:

Firstly (right upper), looking forward from beside the kitchen, from the far end looking forward to where the back gates and my "repaired" wall now are (where the green bin is in the picture):


Secondly (right lower),  the view looking to the rear from beside what is now the kitchen window:

The tree (visible in both pictures) beside the wall of the house was a lovely pear tree which sadly had to go.  It was so close to the house that a chain saw could not fit between the tree and the wall, but a woodturner friend managed to fell it for me (in exchange for the wood!).  Note the concrete path (along the side of the house) which was about six inches above the floor level inside, whereas my black limestone slabs are five inches below the same floor level.

At the time these photos were taken, we had not actually found the side wall of the garden (somewhere to the left of the bottom photo) as the undergrowth was so thick!  Eventually (about three months later), to our surprise, we found that the garden widens out as you go back (and our neighbour's garden narrows) - I think it is because it follows a boundary along a mediaeval street, which predated both houses!

Wednesday, 16 September 2015

Serious Damp Issues

I've just returned from a short holiday in Venice - we had never been there before and it seemed like a good place to tick off our list of "must-do somewhen".  The whole place is 
fascinating, and it really takes a visit to understand how this small island (or rather a set of smaller islands) is set in a large lagoon with other inhabited islands around.  Much of the lagoon is very shallow and so is un-navigable by everything except the smallest boats, and it is not clear to the eye whether the sea is taking back the land, or the land is being reclaimed from the sea! Probably a bit of both, I fancy.

The Venetians have not helped their predicament by allowing very large ships to dock on the north side of the main island, i.e. the side furthest from the Adriatic Sea.  To accomodate these 100,000 tonne monsters (each with over 5,000 passengers!) they require to keep the waterway past St Mark's Square dredged to about 50 feet, which surely cannot help but encourage the town itself to settle gently?  We were told that most houses are so damp that the ground floor is not used, and there is often as little as a foot difference between the water and ground that we walked on!

Being seriously interested in old buildings and issues such as dampness, I took a lot of
photos which illustrate the problems they have.  I don't think these are attributable to rising damp (if it really exists!), but more largely due to the continually damp and corrosive atmosphere.  Anything close to the water will be washed frequently by natural or man made waves as well as the damp breeze, and so erosion is hardly surprising and is visible everywhere (photo left).
What matters, sadly, is that there has been much use of CEMENT (aaaargh!) and the effects of this are all too readily visible, especially where repointing has been done.

The next two photos on the right show all too clearly what happens when a lime wall is re-pointed with cement.  It might look fine to start with, but ultimately the brick (or stone) starts to spall (i.e. lose its surface) because of the continual presence of the water in the brick which should escape
via the pointing but cannot.  The upper photo is a classic showing how the brick recedes into the wall.


Cement is also used for rendering, with the result that it comes off in sheets.  The photos left and below show cement render just falling off a brick wall.

Another technical issue if the frequent use of stone in an unnatural bed, i.e. laid with the natural grain (due to being sedimentary) at right angles to the ground.  This encourages vertical splits and just looks wrong anyway, as shown left in a wall where there is also spalling brickwork due to cement pointing.




This sort of thing is evident everywhere, and I fear for the future of the buildings for this reason alone, never mind the rising sea levels.  Unfortunately they seem to have made their natural problems worse by their own poor maintenance practices.  However, on the plus side, they do have lots of lovely old buildings (right), even though most of them look in need of a bit of TLC!

Sunday, 23 August 2015

Renovating Sash Windows

Well, four years after moving in, I cannot procrastinate any longer: I have started to renovate the sash windows at last.

The house has seven old sash windows (as well as the new double sash in the kitchen and the replacement Venetian window in the lounge, both fitted in 2011), most of which have old wavy glass.  Four are standard two over two, two are a pair of one over one in the bathroom (but they are totally separate windows) and the final one is our bedroom window at the front of the house (photo right): it is basically a normal two over two but each glass has an extra narrow pane on its outside, so there are two normal size panes and two narrow ones in each sash - eight bits of glass in all. Being a cautious sort, I wanted to start with a standard one at the back of the house but t'other half wanted me first to address the tatty complicated one at the front.  The thick paint was flaking and was missing two sash cords, the glass was barely attached and the cill was rotting, not to mention the catch which was rusted solid and loosely attached.

So, first thing on Monday last week, after much research and some advance purchases, and with a fairly favourable weather forecast, the lower sash was removed.  Basically, the process with each sash was to remove the glass (carefully!), completely remove all paint
and old putty, do any necessary repairs, prime, refit the glass and finally finish the painting.  Concurrently, the window frame itself needed a complete strip, replacement of four worn brass pullies (pulleys?), four new sash cords and new parting beads, not to mention some major woodwork repairs.  Looking at the photo (left), it reminded me of having a missing tooth for two weeks - too late to go back now!
The lower sash had loose tenons at the bottom corners, not to mention three loose glazing bars, and so needed re-gluing.  The photo right shows its condition after removing the glass and doing a fair bit of stripping.  One of the narrow panes had been cracked when we bought the house, and I had kept an old piece of wavy glass for just that job - it just needed cutting down.  The rest of the job was some hours of stripping, scraping and sanding, plus a small amount of extra gluing.

The upper sash came out on Tuesday morning.  This one had never fitted properly, and the reason for this was immediately apparent as the weights rested on the bottom while the
window was an inch from the top.  It also had a nasty steel bracket holding the centre glazing bar to the bottom cross member - sadly it wasn't in the right position and there was a 7mm gap to the lower bar.  That one I had already decided to do with some stuff called "Repair Care Dry Flex 4"; this is designed specially for things like doing structural repairs to window frames and isn't cheap - but it does the job admirably (the yellow green bits in the photo left)!

I managed to remove all seven unbroken pieces of glass from both sashes without further breakage - the eighth piece was already cracked when we bought the house and I had kept some old glass from the old lounge window as a replacement.  I also decided to use "Repair Care Dry Seal" instead of linseed putty; this is permanently elastic and seems a better bet after my poor efforts at using proper putty a few years ago!

I thought I had a good idea of how long all this work would take but, once again, I underestimated and it was not until Wednesday of this week (nine days after starting) that I 
was able to fit the freshly painted and glazed sashes back in place (right, before glazing).  I reckon it was over 40 manhours of work as well.  Everything went to plan except that it all took longer; even the weather was kind and no rain got onto my south facing work site until I was refitting the sashes.  I did break one of the narrow pieces whilst cleaning it but, fortunately, I had kept TWO pices from the old lounge window!  The only other issue, at the last minute, was a nasty splinter in the index finger of my right hand, due to careless sanding.

There was also the small matter of the window cill, which was oak but suffering from rot. 
I took off all the poor wood and covered the whole thing in Dry Flex, leaving a gap underneath for some sealant.  At the left bottom corner the sash frame had rotted and so this also received the Dry Flex treatment.  I slaved in a new bottom piece for the front frame, plus some bits for the cross member, both visible in the photo left.  The parting bead is also visible but this is simply a press fit (well, block and mallet).

So, I need to finish off various bits of detail like sealing around the frame and doing the black top coat, but the (almost) finished result has already attracted positive comment from friends, who say that it looks better than the similar window next door (restored three years ago by V******a).  I'll post a completed picture soon.